Member Login | Join SPJ | Benefits | Rates

> Latest News, Blogs and Events (tap to expand)


Advertisement
— ADVERTISEMENT —
Advertise with SPJ
1

News and More
Click to Expand Instantly

SPJ News
SPJ Blogs
Quill Online
Journalist's Toolbox

Stay in Touch
Twitter Storify Facebook Google Plus
RSS Pinterest Pinterest Flickr


Diversity
News/Articles
Diversity Sourcebook
Diversity Toolbox
Sourcebook Teaching Plan
Anti-Profiling Guidelines
The Whole Story: Tips & Tools
Chapter Programming
Diversity Committee


Who's News?
SPJ's Diversity Committee Blog
View all entries
– Muslimedia sheds light on the darkness of media’s coverage of Muslim Americans
– University pays high honor to Pulitzer-winning journalist George Ramos
– October is LGBT History Month

Diversity Committee
On both chapter and national levels, SPJ provides an open forum for the discussion of diversity issues in journalism. This committee's purpose is to promote a broader voice in newsrooms across the country and expand the depth and quality of news reports through better sourcing. Its ongoing project is the compilation of experts — primarily women, gays and lesbians, people of color and people with disabilities — through the Society's Diversity Source Book. The Society's relevance to its member is based on inclusiveness.

Diversity Toolbox
Home
Diversity is Accuracy
Cross Your ‘Faultlines’
Why Diversity?
Call on the Community
Covering Disability Issues
Tips for Better Sourcing
Watch Your Language
How to Get Help
Tips for Smarter Reporting
Program in a Box


Rainbow Diversity Sourcebook
Search
Submit Source


Searching the Sourcebook
To search, check one or more of the topic boxes, then scroll down to the bottom and click “search.”

You can limit your original search by state, “minority voice” or other choices — but the more you limit the search, the fewer results you will get.

If you know the name or organization of the source you are seeking, fill in any of the “personal information” blanks.

See the Diversity Toolbox for essays on how to make your work more inclusive and for comprehensive links to other resources.


Diversity Committee Chair

Dori Zinn
President, Blossomers Media
E-mail
@dorizinn
Bio (click to expand) Dori Zinn is the President of Blossomers Media, a web development and online media company. This is her second year as President of SPJ Florida Pro. For five years, Zinn served on the board as Vice President of Membership for the chapter, helping win SPJ's “Chapter of the Year” in 2010, 2014, and 2016. This is her first year as chair of the Diversity Committee.

Diversity Committee Members

April Bethea
Online Producer
The Charlotte Observer

Tracy Everbach
Associate Professor of Journalism
University of North Texas

Sandra Gonzalez

Robert Moran

Sally Lehrman
Director, Journalism Program
Markkula Center for Applied Ethics
Santa Clara University

Christiana Lilly

Jason Parsley

Georgiana Vines
Retired Associate Editor
Knoxville News Sentinel

Home > Home > Diversity > Get to the Source > When you need a good source, who do you call?

Diversity
Get to the Source:
A Teaching Plan


Overview | Classes | Sources Used | Download PDF Copy

When you need a good source, who do you call?

Society of Professional Journalists' Diversity Toolbox

It's not easy to break into an unfamiliar community and find great sources on demand. If reporters develop some background first, they will be ready to hit the streets when they're on deadline. Here are some ways to learn more about community issues and develop a broader sector of possible sources.

Bring in the community or go to them.
Reporters can organize a meeting with people from communities they don't usually include in their stories. First, acknowledge that there may be some longstanding and legitimate problems with trust. Then ask these questions:

• What do you wish we covered more?
• What do you think we get wrong?
• What is the history of your community in this issue area? (For example, a Latino medical reporter could ask why so many African Americans distrust the medical system.)
• Who are a few leaders in your community?
• Pick up flyers and brochures from community organizations to find out what they do and what issues the community finds most compelling.

Go out and look around.
Encourage reporters to do at least one activity every week that takes them into another commu nity but that doesn't have anything to do with a story they're working. They could:
• Attend a cultural event.
• Go to church or another religious gathering.
• Go to a community meeting and just listen.
• Go to a professional networking meeting and talk to people.
• Go to a community barbeque or picnic.
• Volunteer for a day at a community center for elders.
• Go to an activist meeting for people with disabilities.
• Go to an exhibit that features transgender youth or a museum about African American history.
• Go to a coffeehouse or bar.
• Seek out voices beyond the self-appointed leaders in the community — they may not represent the community well.

Listen, read and learn.
Ask reporters to read more magazines and newspapers, and to listen to talk shows or music format stations that serve populations they want to learn about. They could:
• Subscribe to newspapers or magazines targeted toward the gay, black, Latino, or Asian or Asian American communities.
• Listen to a local bilingual station.
• Listen to a Christian evangelical station.
• Read the newspaper sold to you by a homeless person.
• Read poetry or fiction written by urban youth.

Ask the question.
Race, sexuality, gender and disability often are topics that we skirt around. Urge your reporters to spend some time with sources they are developing and to consider direct questions like this, even when demographics don't seem relevant to the story. The answers might push the story into interesting new places.
• Do you think your race or ethnicity (age, gender, religion, economic background, etc.) affects the way you think about this issue?
• As someone not of your community (race, ethnicity, gender, other) what do you think I might miss when reporting about this?

Pay attention to language.
Consider learning a new language if your area has a sizable community that speaks another language.

If the community is primarily immigrant and speaks English as a second language, develop a relationship with organizations that serve immigrants to open doors for you, ease fears and help with translation.

Be cautious in selecting interpreters when reporting a controversial issue or when your interpreters may have a stake in the story.

For more ideas, visit the Rainbow Sourcebook.

© Society of Professional Journalists, Diversity Toolbox
Funded by the SDX Foundation

[Top]

Stay in Touch
Twitter Storify Facebook Google Plus RSS Pinterest Pinterest
Flickr LinkedIn Tout


Diversity
News/Articles
Diversity Sourcebook
Diversity Toolbox
Sourcebook Teaching Plan
Anti-Profiling Guidelines
The Whole Story: Tips & Tools
Chapter Programming
Diversity Committee


Who's News?
SPJ's Diversity Committee Blog
View all entries
– Muslimedia sheds light on the darkness of media’s coverage of Muslim Americans
– University pays high honor to Pulitzer-winning journalist George Ramos
– October is LGBT History Month

Diversity Committee
On both chapter and national levels, SPJ provides an open forum for the discussion of diversity issues in journalism. This committee's purpose is to promote a broader voice in newsrooms across the country and expand the depth and quality of news reports through better sourcing. Its ongoing project is the compilation of experts — primarily women, gays and lesbians, people of color and people with disabilities — through the Society's Diversity Source Book. The Society's relevance to its member is based on inclusiveness.

Diversity Toolbox
Home
Diversity is Accuracy
Cross Your ‘Faultlines’
Why Diversity?
Call on the Community
Covering Disability Issues
Tips for Better Sourcing
Watch Your Language
How to Get Help
Tips for Smarter Reporting
Program in a Box


Rainbow Diversity Sourcebook
Search
Submit Source


Searching the Sourcebook
To search, check one or more of the topic boxes, then scroll down to the bottom and click “search.”

You can limit your original search by state, “minority voice” or other choices — but the more you limit the search, the fewer results you will get.

If you know the name or organization of the source you are seeking, fill in any of the “personal information” blanks.

See the Diversity Toolbox for essays on how to make your work more inclusive and for comprehensive links to other resources.
 

Copyright © 1996-2016 Society of Professional Journalists. All Rights Reserved.

Legal | Policies

Society of Professional Journalists
Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Center
3909 N. Meridian St.
Indianapolis, IN 46208
317/927-8000 | Fax: 317/920-4789

Contact SPJ Headquarters
Employment Opportunities
Advertise with SPJ