The First Amendment is under attack. Fight back with us. Visit fight.spj.org to find out how.

Member Login | Join SPJ | Benefits | Rates

> Latest News, Blogs and Events (tap to expand)


Advertise with SPJ
— ADVERTISEMENT —
Advertise with SPJ
2

News and More
Click to Expand Instantly

Journalist's Toolbox

— ADVERTISEMENT —


Stay in Touch
Twitter Storify Facebook Google Plus
RSS Pinterest Pinterest Flickr



Current Issue
Browse Archive
About Quill
Advertising Info
Back Issue Request
Reprint Permission Form
Pulliam/Kilgore Internship Info

Search Quill


Publications
SPJ Blogs
Quill
SPJ Leads
The EIJ News
Press Notes
SPJ News
Open Doors
Geneva Conventions
Annual FOI Reports

Home > Publications > Quill > SDX Awards: Online, investigative reporting, affiliated


Current Issue | Browse Archive | About Quill | Advertising Info
Back Issues | Reprint Permission Form

Search Quill


Friday, June 30, 2006
SDX Awards: Online, investigative reporting, affiliated

Winner: Luke Timmerman, David Heath, Tracy Cutchlow and Ping Yeh — Seattletimes.com

By Chris Speckman

It didn’t take the government long to react when Seattletimes.com revealed a fantastic pharmaceutical industry secret.

“ ‘Selling Drug Secrets’ drew the quickest response of any Seattle Times investigation in memory,” said Stanley Farrar, managing editor of the periodical’s online companion. “Within hours of reading the published report and viewing supporting documents at seattletimes.com/drugsecrets, Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, called for a federal investigation into selling drug secrets.”

The Times removed the veil from the unsightly dealing going on between drug companies and Wall Street. Reporters Luke Timmerman and David Heath discovered that investing firms were slipping money to drug makers to get the inside edge on trading. As their investigation got rolling, the secret seemed to snowball.

“The Seattle Times found 26 cases in which doctors leaked confidential information to Wall Street firms, a practice with a painful cost to society,” Farrar said. “Trading stock on purchased inside information is not only illegal but can introduce bias into drug trials and possibly half-development of potentially life-saving drugs.”

The degree of the damaging side effects of the revelation likely prompted immediate government action. Clearly a national epidemic, the Web was instrumental for passing along the secret.

On Seattletimes.com, visitors could read Timmerman and Heath’s story, view interactive charts and timelines and listen to audio quotes, including one doctor’s illuminating conference call.

It was an unmatched package on an untouched subject.

“Other newspapers tried to catch up with our investigation, but none presented on-the-record, documented cases, as our two reporters had done,” said Farrar.

And one the judges found unbeatable.

“This combination of months of detail-gathering and multiple layers of interactivity is the essence of investigative Web reporting, and the Seattletimes.com team captured it beautifully,” said the judges.

Stay in Touch
Twitter Storify Facebook Google Plus RSS Pinterest Pinterest
Flickr LinkedIn Tout



Current Issue
Browse Archive
About Quill
Advertising Info
Back Issue Request
Reprint Permission Form
Pulliam/Kilgore Internship Info

Search Quill


Publications
SPJ Blogs
Quill
SPJ Leads
The EIJ News
Press Notes
SPJ News
Open Doors
Geneva Conventions
Annual FOI Reports

Copyright © 1996-2017 Society of Professional Journalists. All Rights Reserved.

Legal | Policies

Society of Professional Journalists
Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Center
3909 N. Meridian St., Suite 200
Indianapolis, IN 46208
317/927-8000 | Fax: 317/920-4789

Contact SPJ Headquarters
Employment Opportunities
Advertise with SPJ