The First Amendment is under attack. Fight back with us. Visit fight.spj.org to find out how.

Member Login | Join SPJ | Benefits | Rates

> Latest News, Blogs and Events (tap to expand)


Advertisement
— ADVERTISEMENT —
Advertise with SPJ
1

News and More
Click to Expand Instantly

Journalist's Toolbox

— ADVERTISEMENT —


Stay in Touch
Twitter Storify Facebook Google Plus
RSS Pinterest Pinterest Flickr



Current Issue
Browse Archive
About Quill
Advertising Info
Back Issue Request
Reprint Permission Form
Pulliam/Kilgore Internship Info

Search Quill


Publications
SPJ Blogs
Quill
SPJ Leads
The EIJ News
Press Notes
SPJ News
Open Doors
Geneva Conventions
Annual FOI Reports

Home > Publications > Quill > Winner: Jim Litke, The Associated Press


Current Issue | Browse Archive | About Quill | Advertising Info
Back Issues | Reprint Permission Form

Search Quill


Wednesday, July 9, 2008
Winner: Jim Litke, The Associated Press

Jim Poyser

Jim Litke is the face of AP Sports. A bald head. A quick smile. A snappy comeback,” Associated Press Sports Editor Terry Taylor said. “Litke is informed, insightful and just cynical enough, with an easygoing manner that makes people want to talk to him. He’s a plain ol’ nice guy, really, yet he’s hardly a patsy.”

Judges said, “Great diversity of stories. Well written and captures the full range of emotions. Great reporting went into the columns.”

The following are excerpts from a handful of his columns:

Cover your right eye. Now imagine being loaded into a starting gate alongside the best thoroughbreds in the land. The gate flings open and just ahead and to either side, 19 other horses are jostling for position as the first turn draws near. Then add 100,000 railbirds in full roar, throwing as many decibels as a jet engine on takeoff. That’s how the Kentucky Derby will sound to a long gray colt with one good eye named Storm in May.

It’s hard to imagine the son of Georgetown legend John Thompson calling somebody else “Coach.” John Thompson III does it all the time. He means no disrespect toward the man he affectionately calls “Pops,” who taught him plenty about life, much of what he knows about basketball and almost single-handedly built the Hoya program his son inherited three years ago and guided all the way to this Final Four.

Would the public be clamoring just as loudly for Michael Vick’s head if he’d come clean after being caught with a suitcase full of illegal steroids? Or cocaine? Or beating up a woman?

Just asking.

Because in all those cases, depending on aggravating circumstances and a number of other factors, the fine and jail time Vick would face after pleading guilty – in his case, to a federal dogfighting conspiracy charge – could be roughly the same. In terms of what else Vick stands to lose, it isn’t even close.

Stay in Touch
Twitter Storify Facebook Google Plus RSS Pinterest Pinterest
Flickr LinkedIn Tout



Current Issue
Browse Archive
About Quill
Advertising Info
Back Issue Request
Reprint Permission Form
Pulliam/Kilgore Internship Info

Search Quill


Publications
SPJ Blogs
Quill
SPJ Leads
The EIJ News
Press Notes
SPJ News
Open Doors
Geneva Conventions
Annual FOI Reports

Copyright © 1996-2017 Society of Professional Journalists. All Rights Reserved.

Legal | Policies

Society of Professional Journalists
Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Center
3909 N. Meridian St., Suite 200
Indianapolis, IN 46208
317/927-8000 | Fax: 317/920-4789

Contact SPJ Headquarters
Employment Opportunities
Advertise with SPJ